History

SELECTMEN'S TRIALS

From the Issue: 
June 2011
In the Troy Selectmen's Office in the early 1960's the Selectmen were  L.E. Ray Hale, 48 years on Board, Clarence Abare, 25 years and Arthur McKew, 3 or less years.
    I was the Personnel Manager at Troy Mills.  There had been talk around the mill of meat being sold from the building on Farrar's Pond, on the Old Marlboro Road, bottom of hill after going over the bridge across the tracks. Prices like 4 lbs of hamburger, $1 / pound and other cuts of meat had real low prices..
    Around 3:00 PM. on a Friday Clarence called me and told me to get my A-- up to the Town Hall, we had a trip to make.  I said I was due at a meeting, Clarence said the H--- with the meeting, this is Town business.  I joined Clarence immediately.  (He had Seniority over me, so I got a move on) We went to the Pond Meat Shop.
    "We are here to close you down, right now, you have no refrigeration.  You can't sell meat without refrigeration." Clarence said to the owner.

DR. STONE'S TROY HISTORY

From the Issue: 
June 2011
With work under way today to prepare a current historical account of Troy it is worthwhile to take a look at the history published by Dr. Stone 114 years ago.  This busy town doctor found time to assemble a 576 page volume about Troy.
    The history occupies 320 pages; 256 following. pages introduce us to 160 men who figured in the early days. Dr. Stone acknowledges that two or three chapters of the volume repeats the work of Dr. A. M. Caverly, whose history of Troy was published in 1859.
    Stone titles his book an "Historical Sketch of Troy, 1764 - 1897."  The early date represents the settlement by William Barker in colonial territory that became Troy.  Prior to that a variety of land speculations had established some boundaries in the Monadnock region, notably the line that defines the western boundary of Troy today.  We learn that sentiment developed early on to sever parts of Fitzwilliam and Marlborough to establish a new town.  The establishment became reality in June, 1815.  Hence the bicentennial looms shortly.

THE TROY MUD HOLE

The MUD HOLE is located north of the late Mike Stone's property off Brick Yard Road which is off Morse Street which is off Prospect Street.  I believe that it is the remnants of the making of bricks way before my "time".  The color "mud" is from the clay pit in which it was formed.  The mud color is like coffee with cream.  The location is on the west side of the old railroad tracks, connected under the tracks with Village Pond.  I have fished it many times for pickerel including ice fishing, from 1940 plus.  But I have not been there for many years.

    Does anyone have a brick made at the old BRICK YARD to donate to the Historical Society?  I remember fishing in MUD HOLE with Howard Moore, two Lepisto brothers from High Street and Armas Kivela, all four of them older than I.

America's first defenders of Liberty

From the Issue: 
May 2011
At the Lexington Mass. Common this day, April 19, 1775, shortly after dawn, Capt. John Parker, who was commanding the Lexington Militia, sent the call for his men to immediately assemble there.  As young William Diamond drummed the call to arms, the men were hastily assembling within earshot of the 700 British Troops approaching.  "He (Parker) met the assembling men on the Common and told sergeant Munroe to draw them up (no more than 40 men) in the two thin lines to make them look more formidable in numbers than they really were.  Having perhaps twenty minutes from the time that Thaddeus Bowman came to him with the last intelligence of the morning until the British were upon him, he made no effort to get his men into the readily available positions in adjacent pastures and woodlands from which they could have both observed the British and had the advantage of surprise and mobility in case of conflict.  But he lined them up on the Common, with orders not to fire." 1    Samuel Adams was a rabble rouser for the cause and I believe he was looking for an event to unify the colonies. This was to be that event.

FITZWILLIAM HISTORICAL SOCIETY

From the Issue: 
May 2011
The Amos J. Blake House Museum will open Saturday May 28th from 1-4 PM for regular summer visits. Trained docents provide a lovely free tour of the historic building.  We look forward to having you drop by. Saturday hours run from Memorial Day to Labor Day weekend.

    We are sending this advance notice for our two annual summer fund raising events.  The “Annual Strawberry Festival” will be Saturday, June 25th from 1-4 PM.  It has been held on the last Saturday in June for over 30 years.  Place this date on your calendar for a mouthwatering delight like no other! 

    The “Annual Antiques Show & Sale” will be held on Saturday, July 16th from 9AM – 3 PM. Beautiful, outstanding antiques from respected exhibitors will fill the Town Common of Fitzwilliam, rain or shine.  Please join us!  

HISTORICAL SOCIETY

From the Issue: 
April 2011
The Troy Historical Society held 2 winter workshops to begin the rearranging of the museum.  Work is slow but we are making progress.  We are planning another workshop Saturday, April 16, 9 to noon.  We will concentrate on moving the Troy Mills display to a better spot.  We are looking for someone to design a display for our Finnish collection.  If you are interested in helping, please contact Kathy at 242-7731.  We will be planning an Open House once the displays are all in place so keep watching the TROY TOWN NEWS for more information.

WAR MEMORIAL COMMISSION

From the Issue: 
April 2011
The Samuel E. Paul War Memorial Commission and Keene State College students would like to thank those who participated in the Sand Dam and Health and Wellness surveys during Election Day and Town meeting.  If you would like to participate in the surveys there are some forms available at the Town Clerks office.

Once the students have collected all their data they will present us with their analysis.  Our Commission will then use this information as a tool to determine what best fits the needs and wishes of our residents in the three-year master plan.

Our commission continues to grow and we welcome our newest member Jim Fallon.  Thank you Jim for volunteering your time to be a part of our research group.

CHESHIRE RR DEPOT

From the Issue: 
April 2011
The Cheshire RR Depot Commission is busy getting ready for spring!  It's time to put away the Christmas tree decorations and start discussing our summer events.  We plan to have more family movies out under the stars and work closely with the Troy Recreation Committee and other committees in town.  John Satas will be busy building the Station Master's telegraph table, which will be completed by Memorial Day.  The funding for these renovations is difficult these days, but we try to make small improvements each year.

The interviews for our documentary are ongoing and the process will be a long one, but we guarantee the end result will be worth the wait.  Our Commission would also like to welcome Neal Richardson to our team.  Thank you for giving your time and support to our commission!

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