History

ROUNDY DIARY OF 1872

From the Issue: 
October 2010
Harriett (Hattie) Mansfield Roundy, wife of Edward, lived in Fitzwilliam and was very close with her neighbors, especially Maria Angier, the first wife of Ruebin L. Angier, the great-grandfather of Peggy Angier Rouleau of Troy.     

FITZWILLIAM HISTORICAL SOCIETY, HAUNTED HOUSE!!

From the Issue: 
October 2010
Are you brave enough to enter the chilling abode of the Amos J. Blake House Museum at Halloween?  Join us as we open the 1837 house to the public during this frightening week-end.  Witches will beckon you through the front door with spidery fingers!  Rooms with creepy themes will be dim with shadows of the unknown in every corner.
   
This spooky event is being done in association with Rick Hoyt and Valerie Coates of Rindge who formerly ran the Haunted Barn at Shadowledge.  Their famous creatures of fright will be in attendance for this terrifying Halloween happening!
   
Cost is $1 per person.  The museum is located on the Fitzwilliam Town Common (66 Route 119, General James Reed Highway).  The Fitzwilliam Historical Society is a non-profit organization.  Dates are Friday & Saturday, October 29th & 30th from 7 -1 0 PM and Sunday, October  31st 2010 from 8 PM- 10 PM.  Adult supervision and discretion is advised. Enter at your own risk! www.fitzhistoricalsociety.org

TROY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

From the Issue: 
September 2010
We would like to thank everyone who stopped by our booth at the Old Home Days.

It was interesting to hear the comments and see the reactions to what women had to wear in the 1800s.

Pete, Bob, and Gary were there early to assemble our display case and Kathy arranged the display which consisted of a beautiful 1800s wedding gown, lady's day gowns, a black velvet beaded cape, and some dresses for young children.  We would like to thank the Fitzwilliam Historical Society for loaning the fashions in our display.

THOREAU IN TROY

From the Issue: 
September 2010
Editor’s note:  Art had sent this last month, but as TTN doesn’t publish in August, we decided to include it in this issue.  Thanks, Art, for the interesting tidbits you send along!

The last trip (last of four trips) Henry David Thoreau made to visit Mount Monadnock started when he arrived in Troy, via the railroad on August 4, 1860.  Ellery Channing was traveling with him and they camped on the Mountain for four days.  They left the mountain on August 9th heading to Troy to catch a train to Concord, MA.  That August 9 was a beautiful day according to Thoreau's Journal.  It was a three hour walk from the Mountain to the RR station. 
    The date of August 9th just passed would be the 150th

WELCOME TO TROY...

From the Issue: 
September 2010
alongside major roads coming into town: one in each direction on Route 12, and a third near the Jaffrey town line on Monadnock Street.  At the same time, a matching Reader Board was located on the Common.  These resulted from Troy’s Planning Charrette, when Dorrie Upton worked with then-Selectmen Ed Thomas and Glenn Shattler to oversee their design, construction and installation, completed in 2005.

The signs themselves were designed and fabricated by McAnney Fine Carved Signs, located at 574 Monadnock HIghway [Rt. 12] in East Swanzey.  The granite posts came from Ground Up Landscape Materials, 387 Monadnock HIghway also in East Swanzey.  The granite posts were made possible through the generous donations of Iver & Dorothy Olsen, Don & Marion Austin, Mary Kaye, Dave & Sally Adams, and Don & Dorrie Upton.  The installation was done by Jim Dicey and Ed Thomas.

HISTORIETTE GROUP

From the Issue: 
July/August 2010
We are finally receiving photographs, stories, historical facts and humorous tales of Troy-citizen's lives during the twentieth century. I really need much more input. As much of the documentation as possible, if not all, will be assembled, perhaps rewritten and fit in with associated documentation, and added to the final publication which is scheduled for printing in early 2015 and ready for Troy's bicentennial that June. Nancy O'Grady and Jane Silver have provided several more photos of Troy's residents and local places. They, along with Elsie Breen, and Richard Lawrence, added wonderful reminiscences of their lifetimes in town, while Gary Phelps reported on the history of the production phenomenon of the "Palm Hat" by Whitney's Store in the 1800's. Who knows what the "palm hat" was?

OLD TROY 'TIN SHOP HOUSE'

From the Issue: 
July/August 2010
Some hardy souls may recall the old Troy “Tin Shop House,” or this article from the Monadnock Breeze, December 12, 1930...
    "For some weeks the townspeople and passersby have looked on with much interest during the work of taking down a “landmark” for so many years in this town, called “The Tin Shop House,” owned by the Troy Blanket Mills.  The work has been carefully done by Ernest F. Barrett, a well-known citizen of the town.  As the work went on a frequent question was – “How old must this house be? The removal of the “Tinsmith House” has revealed an enchanting view of mountains and valleys.  It has added to the safety of motor travel. A Troy citizen."

FITZWILLIAM HISTORICAL SOCIETY

From the Issue: 
July/August 2010
Thank you to all who attended our Annual Strawberry Festival on the Common! Special thanks go to the tireless volunteers without whom we could not succeed with this annual summer event. A great time was had by all! 
Our “Dolls, Dollhouses & Miniatures” Exhibit will continue through the month of July, Saturdays from 1-4. Tours of the Amos J. Blake House Museum are always free. There is a sign up sheet for those interested in forming a new dollhouse/miniature club in the area, which will be based in Fitzwilliam. This new club will hopefully commence in the fall of 2010.
July 17th is the date of our Annual Antiques Show & Sale on the Fitzwilliam Town Common. The time is 9-3, rain or shine and remains hugely popular with area residents as well as collectors from far away. Please stop by and enjoy the beautiful high end antiques in an old fashioned country atmosphere.
Syndicate content