History

PRESERVING TROY

From the Issue: 
April 2010
At the March Town meeting the Troy Historical Society presented an Old Troy digital show of selected slides. The point of this presentation was to plug the Society and share some of the "Old Troy" the Society has on file.  The Town Meeting presentation represented only the beginning of the Troy photograph, map, document, table, artifact, etc collection.  Won't you as history minded citizens loan any of your choice items to be scanned and filed at THS.     Photographs turn up monthly that haven't been seen before. Your originals will be returned to you, but the stories they have to tell shouldn't be hidden away in attic shoeboxes.  As the file of slides grows, it can be periodically shared at any public gathering.  Please help the collection grow.

MIGHTY MYSTERIOUS MONADNOCK MONOLITH MANIFESTS!

From the Issue: 
April 2010
As the new month arrived, early risers who happened to glance toward Mt. Monadnock were greeted by an astounding sight – overnight, a mighty mysterious Monolith had manifested at the summit!
    There, perched high and giving off bright rays, stood the strange new dark object, mystifying all who saw it.  As yet, no credible explanation has been offered, of what it may be or what it’s doing up there.  Responses ranged from puzzlement: “Mmmmm… Errr… Weird!  What is it?”
    … to logical rationalization:  “Ahh, ya know?  Must be that new cell tower everyone’s talking about.  Tried to disguise it with some new ‘Monolith’ design, think we wouldn’t notice?  Sure!  Just lookit all that radiation!”
    … to mock panic, as wild-eyed teens ran madly about the Town Common, laughing and screaming: “Aaahh!  Run for your lives, we’re doomed!”

100 YEARS AGO IN TROY

From the Issue: 
March 2010
Glancing at the 1910 Troy Town Report we find Town and School tax assessments amounted to $12,609.53. Teachers' salaries totaled $2345. There were 36 weeks of school, September to June. There were 238 students enrolled - only 11 of these  attended the 9th and tenth (High School) grades.   Highways, Bridges and Sidewalks, expended: $1745.11. 

There were 41 events at Town Hall (dances, movies, fairs, plays and meetings) that year.  Charges by the Town for the use and maintenance of Town Hall raised $195.

No serious fires, excepting one at the Troy Mills Picker House in January.  There were 21 chimney fires requiring help from the Fire Company.  Charles W. Whitney died at age 82.  Population in 1910 was 1331.  32 births recorded.

SUBMARINE TALK

From the Issue: 
March 2010
On March 18 at 7 PM at the Gay-Kimball Library in Troy, two former undersea combatants will square off once again at the Troy Historical Society meeting. This time it's on the surface, out of uniform, and both coming out winners. Tony Haag (Germany) and Bob Hall (USA) will compare their fighting ships and life-aboard-experiences how each lived, fought, and some died. Tony and Bob do not intend to brag, offend, belittle, or insult. History under the seas was made in the `40's and these two "kids" then in their late teens took their respective ships to war and both are here to talk about it  Come share some vivid history with two old salts living in our village. Bob was the baker on his sub, but won't be doing the refreshments on the 18tn.

FITZWILLIAM HISTORICAL SOCIETY

From the Issue: 
March 2010
Beginning March 2nd the Amos J. Blake House Museum will be open on Tuesday mornings from 9:00-11:00 AM instead of Thursdays. We offer this time to the public for the purpose of research and short tours. No appointment is necessary.  We are happy to see that groups are using the museum facilities for meetings and other get-togethers. We welcome your interest in using this lovely building for your meetings, craft group activities and other small events.

We will soon be planning our summer guide program. Free and complete training is offered for those with an interest in local history and the museum in particular. Free tours are offered during summer Saturday afternoons. It is also not too early to think about joining in on our summer fund- raising activities. You do not have to be a Fitzwilliam resident to offer your services. Please send us an  e-mail if you are interested in participating in any of our volunteer activities. .   

THE BETTER ROAD THAT NEVER WAS: MONADNOCK STREET REVISITED – PART 2

From the Issue: 
March 2010
Last month, we left our gentle reader, literally, hanging by the fingernails, waiting to find out the answer to that immortal question…  “What happened to…
    The Better Road That Never Was?”
    That question was treated by Caverly [p. 209] and Stone, who relates [p. 180]:
    “The Ward Hill [which later became known as ‘French Hill’] was formerly one of the most difficult in the town, and was for a long time the subject of complaint.  Many efforts had been made to avoid this, by constructing a road on different ground, but it was found impossible to lay out a road on any ground which should be satisfactory to all parties concerned. But in the fall of 1849, the selectmen, after a careful examination of the whole matter, laid out the present road on the petition of John Lawrence and others, which was completed and opened the following year.”

HISTORICAL SOCIETY

From the Issue: 
March 2010
The Troy Historical Society will hold its annual meeting for the year 2010 on Thursday, March 18th at the Gay-Kimball Library at 7 PM for a presentation by Bob Hall and Toni Haag.  Their topic will be about life on submarines during WWII.  Please join us for a very interesting presentation from two different perspectives.  Refreshments will be served.

The Historical Society's big project for this year is to sponsor the FinnFunn weekend beginning Friday, October 29th and ending Sunday, October 31st.  We are working with Martha Silander and the Inn at East Hill Farm to put together several different activities, lectures, and demonstrations for a fun-filled weekend.  Keep watching for more details as the time draws near.

THE BETTER ROAD THAT NEVER WAS: MONADNOCK STREET REVISITED – PART 1

From the Issue: 
February 2010
While not shown on Phillip Carrigain’s 1816 map, which also failed to distinguish the new [1815] Town of Troy, “Jaffrey Road” and its vicinity had already begun to populate with settlers.  It gained mention as a stage road as early as 1803, linking Troy village with East Hill and the Third NH Turnpike [1800], now Rt. 124. 
    This was, essentially, the same road we travel, today called “Monad-nock Street.”  But to get from Point A [the Town Library] to Point B [Rt. 124] in a more-or-less direct line, one must traverse several challenging hills and interspersed vestigial watercourses along the way – up and down, up and down.  Could a better route be located?  Was there no alternative?
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