CHESHIRE FAIR 2009

The Cheshire Fair in Swanzey, NH is celebrating its 71st anniversary in 2009.  For five days each year, the Cheshire Fairground becomes an array of fun from A to Z.  From animals to zucchini, fairgoers can find something for every family member - Draft Horse Pulling for Dad - Country Music for Mom - Carnival Rides and a Children's Farm Fun Barn for the Kids - and a Demolition Derby anf Monster Truck Shows for the whole family.  Tractor Pulling and Woodsmen Competitions give local participants the opportunity to test their skills.

FITZWILLIAM FARMER’S MARKET

The growing season progresses despite the cloudy days.  We encourage you to drop by the Fitzwilliam Farmer’s Market on Saturday mornings, 9 AM - 12 noon next to the Fitzwilliam Town Hall.  Offered are wonderful varieties of fresh vegetables, crisp greens, fresh eggs from ducks and chickens, warm homemade breads and pastries, and smooth farm-made goat soap, among other homemade or homegrown goods  from our local farmers.  Many plants and flowers are offered throughout the season and into fall.  You do not have to be a resident of Fitzwilliam to join!

TROY SENIOR CITIZENS

So far, a beautiful summer, flowers are flourishing so colorful, wish summer didn't pass so quickly.  Enjoy while you can.  We have had some great times at the Seniors, our trip in June, and our Yankee Swap in June, now we must get busy for the Old Home Days at the end of July.  On Thursday night we may be sponsoring Bingo at Kimball Hall so start saving your Mad Money so you can have a great time.  Remember this is  open to the public so get your friends together and spend the night playing Bingo.  This will be the start of the Old Home Day weekend.

CHECK YOUR HEALTH

A wellness nurse from Home healthcare, Hospice and Community Services will be available at Meadowood for a Nurse Is In clinic on Monday, July 20 from 11 AM until Noon.  In August the clinic will be held on August 17.  Plan to come to Meadowood and have your blood pressure checked and ask health questions. 
   
No appointment is needed and the service is provided free of charge to residents of all ages. 

For more information telephone 352-2253 or 1-800-541-4145 or visit www.HCSservices.org.

TROY REVALUATION

The appraisal firm of Vision Appraisal Technology has been hired by the Town of Troy to begin a Town wide Revaluation Project.  The following is a general outline and explanation of each phase of the project.  Vision Appraisal will be working with the Assessor’s Office as well as The State of New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration to make the process a successful one.  There are four major phases to a municipal revaluation that are being utilized: Market Analysis, Valuation, Field Review, and Informal Hearings.

PHASE 1: MARKET ANALYSIS

TROY QUIZ – MARCH

There is a grocery store on the South end of the Troy Common. (The Town Hall is on the North side of the common) In the late 1930s and the 40s and maybe the real early 1950s it was operated by two brothers (they may even have been twins).
1. What was the name of the store? It was a IGA store. The real name of the store included the last name of the brothers.
2. What were the first names of the brothers? Their first names began with the same letter of the alphabet.

STOP THE ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE!

Thursday, March 19th, 2009
7 PM - 9 PM Gay-Kimball Library 10-South Main St., Troy, NH
Do you know the signs of the Asian Longhorned Beetle? Do you know the threat this beetle poses to New Hampshire's forests? This exotic, potentially devastating insect has been found in Worcester, MA - 40 miles from the New Hampshire border - and has the potential to spread north.

TROY’S FIRST WATER SYSTEM

Actually, it was a HYDRANT SYSTEM! Just over a hundred years ago, nearly everyone in town had their own well, or a neighbor’s, to provide water for household usage. In those days, heating and cooking needs were generally met by wood or coal stoves and fireplaces, with the result that building fires [houses, barns, shops, mills, etc.] were an all-too-common problem. The local fire company—equipped with the town’s man-powered pumper, hoses, and assorted nearby ponds—was often hard-pressed to deal with these frequent emergencies.

Syndicate content